Connecting with Clifton Town Meeting in 2019

Welcome to 2019! We recommend you bookmark this post as below are some key information about Clifton Town Meeting for your use.

Clifton Town Meeting (CTM) has a Board of 15 Trustees. The organization has a set of bylaws that govern its operation and action.

Your Trustees for 2019 are as follows:

Brad Hawse – President
Pat Borders – Vice President 1
Joyce Rich – Vice President 2
Joe Brunner – Secretary
Buddy Goose – Treasurer
Peter Block
Christine Celsor
Brian Duffy
Rama Kasturi
Seth Maney
Gina Marsh
Kevin Marsh
Vince Metzger
Malcolm Montgomery
Peggy Spohr

There are many ways to interact, engage, volunteer, and communicate with CTM.

In person options

We have monthly Board meetings. The schedule is set every January at the first Board meeting of the year. Generally, the meetings are on the first Monday of the month from 7-9pm at the Clifton Recreation Center. Exact dates will be posted on the Clifton Community Calendar website page.

You can speak at these meetings on a specific topic or at the end of the meeting. Community members should sign up to speak on an agenda item before the start of the meeting. Not all agenda items will have time reserved for public input. Individual input on agenda items will be no more than two minutes. Community members are able to speak on non-agenda issues during the public questions and concerns agenda item. Individuals with statements are asked to sign in before the start of the meeting. Statements will be no more than three minutes during the questions and concerns agenda item.

CTM produces or co-sponsors some events each year.

2019 Event Captains (Event – Captain)

  • Memorial Day Parade/Cookout – Buddy Goose
  • Clifton Fest Booth – CTM Business Committee
  • Golf Outing – Eric Urbas
  • Lantern Walk – Vince Metzger
  • Holidays on Ludlow – Brad Hawse

All events are more successful when we have volunteers from the community to participate in planning or on the day of the event.  The Clifton House Tour is held every 3 years on Mother’s Day. Next Tour is 2021. Planning always starts in the year prior to the event.

CTM Committees are always seeking volunteers for specific activities or for longer-term participating in the work of the Committee. Your involvement, be it big or small, is welcome and desired.

Committees and Chairpersons for 2019

  • Committee – Chairperson
  • Beautification – Seth Maney
  • Business District – Joyce Rich & Gina Marsh
  • Chronicle – Vince Metzger
  • Website / Social Media – Brian Duffy
  • Membership – Kevin Marsh
  • Housing and Zoning – Malcolm Montgomery
  • Nominating – Patrick Borders
  • Clifton Community LLC – Brad Hawse & Buddy Goose
  • Transportation / Public Safety – Mike Schur
  • Parks – Rama Kasturi & Seth Maney
  • Education – Vince Metzger
  • Arts & Culture – Sean Mullaney

Ad Hoc Committees

  • Bylaws – Malcolm Montgomery
  • Fundraising – Brad Hawse
  • Save the CCAC – Malcolm Montgomery
  • Walking Routes – Kevin Marsh

Liaison Roles

  • Uptown / NOU – Joyce Rich
  • Invest In Neighborhoods – Buddy Goose
  • TriHealth – Brad Hawse
  • Clifton Community Fund – Joyce Rich
  • CPBA – Joyce Rich
  • UC Health – Rama Kasturi

Some of our Committees hold public engagement / discussion meetings to gather input on specific topics. These are announced in advance by email and put onto social media channels.

Membership

Our organization is always seeking the financial support of the community through a variety of membership options. You can start or renew a membership online by clicking here.  We run a more detailed membership drive effort each year as well describing the benefits of being a member. Memberships are for the calendar year and there are never any late fees! CTM is a 501c3 so your membership is considered a charitable contribution. Click here to renew or join as a member of CTM for 2019.

Emails to CTM

CTM has multiple emails that you can use to convey information, concerns, questions, volunteer, etc:
• Our primary email is contactctm@Cliftoncommunity.org. This email is monitored daily. Your email is forwarded to the most appropriate person or Committee for a response. When in doubt, use this email for all purposes.
• Financial matter to address with our Treasurer, please email ctmtreasurer@cliftoncommunity.org
• Matters dealing with Housing & Zoning, you can email the Committee directly at housingandzoning@cliftoncommunity.org
• Submit an article / photo for the Clifton Chronicle or wish to place an ad, you can email vblack1@cliftoncommunity.org

Emails from CTM

CTM has a subscriber, opt-in, email list that is used to send information & announcements related to Clifton. By signing up to receive these emails, you will enhance your connectedness to the community.  You can unsubscribe at any time. We never sell or share this list, and we do not email you constantly.  You will receive 2-5 emails a month including the monthly CTM meeting agenda. You can opt-in by clicking here.

Clifton Community Website

CTM maintains the Clifton Community website. This website contains a variety of news, calendar, public safety links, prior CTM meeting minutes, Clifton Chronicle issues, links to institutions & businesses in Clifton, and much more. There are links on the website to submit questions / concerns directly to CTM.

The Clifton Community Calendar has a moderated submission link that you can use to create entries for community events on the calendar.

Social Media

CTM operates various social media accounts:

• Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/CliftonTownMeeting
• Twitter account – https://twitter.com/cliftontownmeet @cliftontownmeet
• NextDoor Clifton account – https://clifton.nextdoor.com/login

Social media “likes”, shares & retweets do not imply Board positions or agreement. We like to promote Clifton related events for the good of the community.

Postal Mail

We accept mail at PO Box 20042, Cincinnati, OH 45220. This is the slowest way to contact us.

Thank you. We look forward to seeing and hearing from you.

Mount Storm Park Master Plan Funding

Dear Cliftonite:

Mount Storm Park is a treasure many of us in the neighborhood and across the region have enjoyed for decades. Over the last year, a group of us have been working on a project to develop a Master Plan to revitalize the park by restoring Adolph Strauch’s historic design.

Many will recall that Strauch was the Austrian landscape architect invited to Cincinnati by Robert Bowler (whose large estate is now Mount Storm Park) in 1850. Bowler admired Strauch’s landscape designs at the Royal Botanical Gardens in London and was taken by their pastoral feel, the placement of trees on the land that surprises and awes visitors. In addition to being the Cincinnati Parks’ first Superintendent and designer of Mount Storm and other estates along Lafayette Avenue, Strauch famously went on to design Spring Grove Cemetery.

The Cincinnati Parks Foundation, the Clifton Community Fund (the Parks’ Mt. Storm Advisory Council), and several generous individuals have donated to a restricted fund within the Foundation to develop a Master Plan for Mt. Storm that provides for moving, planting, and maintaining new trees in the mode of Strauch’s aesthetic; removing the dead trees and trimming existing ones; and cleaning up the invasive species crowding some of the Park area. The Plan for selection and location of plantings is being developed by the landscape architectural firm, Human Nature, and will be completed in January.

The Parks will contribute staff support and has already begun construction to reduce the size of the parking lot (without reducing parking spaces) to increase greenspace. Our goal is to have at least 2/3 of the planting completed before the end of 2019, including a redesign of the shelter house garden areas. Parks have estimated the budget for the project at approximately $70,000. $50,000 of that has been raised, and an ongoing fundraising campaign is being managed by the Foundation.

Contributions to this exciting project will honor and celebrate the extraordinary and often overlooked contribution nature, and trees in particular, make to our physical and mental health and to the wildlife that is supported by a well-designed greenspace. We see this as a legacy investment in our Parks, our children and grandchildren, and the planet; it is one sure thing we can do today for a better future for us
all.

All gifts are 100% tax-deductible, and gifts of any amount are appreciated. Larger donations of $1,000 or more will be honored with name recognition on a plaque within Mount Storm Park. Please click here to make a donation in support of Mt. Storm.

Sincerely,
Mary Jo Vesper & Bob Rack
Clifton Community Fund

CliftonFest 2018

CliftonFest 2018 happens on Oct 5 evening and all day & night on Saturday, Oct 6. CTM is a proud sponsor of CliftonFest, and we hope that you will attend. There are local vendors selling original works of art, live music, two kids areas (Habanero Parking lot and Diggs Plaza), and chalk artists creating wonderful drawings before your eyes. Ludlow businesses are heavily involved in the event as well. The kick off on Friday evening brings two local bands to Clifton Plaza.

All the details are at CliftonFest.com.

You can volunteer to help on various small tasks throughout the event by clicking here.

CTM Bylaws Proposals for 2018

During the August and September 2018 CTM meetings, Trustees reviewed the recommendations of the Bylaws Committee regarding various proposals to update the CTM Bylaws. During the Sept 2018 meeting, Trustees voted unanimously to accept this recommendations and put the proposed seven significant bylaws changes before the membership for a vote during the December 2018 membership meeting.

The Bylaws Committee report that was includes all the details is below for your review. Please email us at contactctm@cliftoncommunity.org with feedback and questions.

CTM BYLAWS COMMITTEE JULY 24 BOARD REPORT: FINAL BYLAWS

Malcolm Montgomery, Bylaws Committee Chair; Adam Balz, Brad Hawes, Kevin Marsh, Frank Miller, Michele Murphy. Advisers: Howard Tolley, Derek Tucker

PROPOSALS
Overview:
CTM last revised its Bylaws in December 2015. The Bylaws Committee held seven meetings between February 27 and July 24, 2018 to consider proposed substantive updates that require approval of the Board and membership as well as minor technical corrections that do not. In addition to the extensive pro bono advice received from two attorneys, the committee adopted language from the Model Bylaws prepared by Invest in Neighborhoods (IIN) and received guidance from the IIN Board President and Executive Director as well as the CTM Treasurer. In order to provide CTM members with the required notice of proposed Bylaws Amendments prior to the December annual meeting, the Board should complete its review no later than the October meeting.

Standing Rules:
When expressly authorized in the Bylaws and state law, the CTM Board can adopt Standing Rules that Trustees can revise and/or suspend without the membership vote required for a Bylaws amendment. In June the committee recommended and the Board approved an extensive Standing Rule on Conflict of Interest authorized in a brief Bylaws provision that requires a super majority to revise and/or suspend — ten of the fifteen Board members. In June the Board also approved an Email Vote Standing Rule that requires unanimous approval for all decisions, a state mandate that the Board may not revise or suspend. The committee has proposed several Bylaws provisions authorizing the Board to make additional standing rules and will recommend three additional standing rules for the Board to adopt no later than the November meeting:
1. Special Electronic Meetings rule
2. Financial Affairs rule that addresses periodic independent review of accounts and
procedures fiscal agency and pass through accounts.
3. Rule for specifying Nominating Committee responsibilities and election procedures

Rationale for Substantive Bylaws Changes
1. Revision of several Bylaws that depart from actual, current practice that should be
continued, such as the Article requiring both a Spring and a Fall member meeting each year,
when only a Fall meeting is convened to elect Trustees.
2. Recommendation of new or revised Bylaws and Standing Rules in order to
a) modify current practices that depart from mandatory state/local law, such as
electronic voting,
b) assure implementation of important Bylaws provisions that have not been
followed such as financial record keeping
c) add provisions based on best practices in financial affairs and the conduct of
business meetings

1. ARTICLE II. OBJECT
The Article II (4) Conflict of Interest policy at p. 2, l. 121 has been removed from the Bylaws and revised as a CTM Standing Rule approved by the Board at its June 4 meeting. The new rule clarifies the meaning of divided loyalty and financial conflict of interest with new text from the IIN Invest in Neighborhoods Model COI Policy and also includes the remaining CTM Bylaws provision on COI from Section 11 of Article V at page 7, line 317.

2. ARTICLE IV. MEMBERSHIP & MEETINGS OF MEMBERS
Annual Membership Meeting. Article IV (4) p. 4, l. 146 provides for a single annual meeting and, following the IIN Model Bylaws approach, establishes a quorum requirement of twelve (12) non-Trustee members and eight (8) Trustees.

Parliamentary Authority Article IV (12). Text moved from Article X to p. 5 l. 234. In order to improve compliance with the Bylaws, applicable law and Roberts Rules, assigns responsibility to the Board Secretary and Chair of the Bylaws Committee for identifying departures. Clarifies the Board’s authority to interpret the Bylaws and to suspend the procedural rules within specified limits. p. 5, l. 239.

3. ARTICLE V. BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND BOARD MEETINGS pp 6-7, l. 244-334.
In accord with state law, proposed amendments authorize the Board to adopt Standing
Rules for both special electronic meetings and email voting. To be accompanied by new Board
approved Standing Rule with detailed procedures. Board duties clarified to include
responsibility for securing formal documents and financial records in a centralized, secure
location.

4. ARTICLE VI. OFFICERS
(4) Treasurer. p. 8, l. 377 Provides for a new financial review of CTM accounts by an independent professional every two years prior to the annual meeting, possibly done by Invest in Neighborhoods at no expense.

5. ARTICLE VIII. NOMINATION AND ELECTION OF TRUSTEES p. 9-10, l. 409-459
Clarifies procedure for selection of 3 Trustees and 2 others as Nominating Committee members and adds language from IIN Model Bylaws specifying non-discrimination in determining eligibility to serve as a Trustee. To be accompanied by new Board approved Standing Rule with detailed procedures.

6. ARTICLE X. FINANCIAL AFFAIRS p. 11, l. 477-502
New article based on current Article V Section 8 with additional provisions from IIN Model Bylaws detailing deposits, authorized expenses, fiscal year, financial review by independent professional and disposition of assets. To be accompanied by new Board approved Standing Rule with detailed procedures.

7. ARTICLE XI. AMENDMENT OF CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS pp. 11-12, l. 504-519.
Two new provisions from IIN Model Bylaws providing for CTM Bylaws review at least once every 3 years and assuring that any invalid Bylaws provision does not eliminate remaining articles that retain full force and effect.

Click here to read the entire bylaws proposal document showing all the above noted changes.

Street Naming Contest

The City of Cincinnati Department of Transportation & Engineering (DOTE) has offered to have Clifton suggest a name for the connector road between Central Parkway and Hopple Street. See the photo below. The road is indicated by a blue line running between two blue circles. CTM Trustees are holding a naming contest to provide a suggested name to City DOTE. Each entry must list the suggested street name and why it is a good name including any significance. Entry form is below the picture for your use.



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Cincinnati Neighborhood Games 2018 – Team Clifton

In 2016, a small but mighty team from Clifton won more golds that any other neighborhood in the Cincinnati Neighborhood Games. Now we’re ready to put together a team to win it all in 2018 and have fun with neighbors along the way.

Adults and children who live, work, worship or go to school in Clifton, please join us for fun neighborhood qualifiers for chess, basketball (HORSE), Steinholding, Trivia, and Backyard games, June 16 – 23.

The 2018 Cincinnati Neighborhood Games is an Olympic-style event that brings all 52 Cincinnati neighborhoods together!

TEAM CLIFTON is going for gold.

Police District 5 HQ Site Selection

The most recent public meeting held by the City Planning & Public Services Departments regarding the site selection for the new District 5 Police HQ was on Thursday, May 24.  This meeting reviewed the process by which the 37 possible site were narrowed to 9 possible sites.  Of the 9 possible sites, 4 sites were noted to have met the highest number of the selection criteria.

These 4 sites are as follows:

  • Central Parkway
  • Dane & Knowlton
  • Hamilton Avenue
  • Kahns-Rhinegeist

The next steps in the site selection process are as follows:

  • Chief of Police and City administration take public input into consideration and make site recommendation to City Manager & Council.
  • Begin property acquisition (Summer 2018)

Following site selection, the City will also form a Community Advisory Group to provide input to the design of the building including art and a public space to uniquely represent all 8 neighborhoods in Police District 5.   The Advisory group will have approximately one meeting a month.  CTM Trustees are hopeful that some Clifton residents will join this Advisory Group.

Please click here to view the full presentation that was given on May 24.  Your CTM Trustees remain open to additional feedback on this process.  Please keep in mind that site selection process is drawing to an end very soon.

 

Entering Year 4 of the Clifton Deer Project

From the CliftonDeer.org Team:

With the sterilization of eight more does last Fall, year 3 of field operations brought the total number of treated deer to 59, or 91% of our total adult female deer population.  Based on field camera counts, the herd within our study area has shrunk by 19% since we started.  This rate of reduction is steady and contrasts sharply with the 30% increase reported by the Parks in the year before we started.  A more detailed Year 3 Field Operations Report can be found on our website here.

Our goal this Fall is to reach 95% by capturing the most elusive does over a series of weekend operations.  In addition to the wile ones who browse happily at our bait sites until just before the darter arrives (never question the intelligence of these critters), we will also be seeking out the “borderland deer” whose territory overlaps with but extends beyond the study area. This should result in more of the benefits of the deer program reaching the streets within the study area closest to Clifton and Ludlow Avenues.

We are happy to report the Ohio Department of Natural Resources has renewed our research permit to continue operations for another two years.  While the numbers from this study, and others around the country, are already showing clear indications sterilization can effectively reduce deer populations in open urban settings, another two years of data will be important to reaching any firm conclusions that might support requests to States for permission to use fertility control as an ongoing urban deer population management tool.

One component of the study, and a critical requirement for the long term viability of sterilization as a management alternative, is making it cost effective.  Obviously, this means comparing sterilization’s effectiveness in reducing deer overabundance to other methods, but it also means finding economically viable ways for communities to implement programs like this one.  To that end, Clifton Deer is in it’s second year of recruiting and training local volunteer veterinary surgeons and a darter-capture specialist.  Transitioning from reliance on expensive out-of-town experts to assumption of these duties by local professionals and volunteers could greatly improve the cost side of the cost effectiveness calculation.

Finally, we are proud to report that as one of the few, and maybe the only citizen initiated and managed fertility control program in the country, CliftonDeer.org was invited by the international Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control to present at a national conference on deer fertility control in New York on May 2nd.  The success of the Clifton project has drawn the attention of experts from around the country.  A video of that conference should soon be available on the Botstiber website at https://www.wildlifefertilitycontrol.org/.

As always, we are grateful for the support of our Clifton neighbors who donate and volunteer their yards and time to make this project possible.  Fundraising for the Fall ’18 operations has begun and your help is needed.  Please consider a tax deductible donation through one of the methods explained on our website at http://cliftondeer.org/donations/.

Have you met Doe #32? Still looking healthy and happy at almost 9 years of age, this gentle doe makes her home in the woods and yards around Mt. Storm Park and is often seen with her BFF, 5 year old Doe #7. Both were sterilized during our December 2015 field operations. (Photo Credit: Sally Skillman)

Bob Rack, co-founder of CliftonDeer.org, giving Clifton international exposure at the Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control conference in NYC earlier this month.

 

The CliftonDeer.org Team

2018 House Tour Reveal – Cox Home / Library

This reveal is the historical building on the 2018 Clifton House Tour.

George Barnesdale Cox. (1853-1916), nationally known for many years as the “Easy Boss of
Cincinnati,” controlled city politics for over 25 years. When in his early 40s, “Boss” Cox contracted the region’s most prominent architectural firm, Hannaford & Sons, to build a residence for for his status in the Clifton Gaslight District on a property opposite Burnet Woods Park. Samuel Hannaford had recently completed both City Hall and Music Hall and over his career designed more than 300 buildings in the Cincinnati area, including a store and apartment building on 7th Street for Cox. Cox lived in Parkview manor and entertained lavishly there from 1895 until his death from pneumonia at age 63 in 1916. His wife maintained the home until she died in 1938. It was bequeathed to the Union Bethel and became a home for girls until 1947 when it was purchased by Pi Kappa Alpha for a fraternity house. In 2007 Michael L. Dever purchased the property and then in 2010 donated it to the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County to become what is now the Clifton Branch of the Library. Upon completion of extensive remodeling to upgrade the building and meet modern facility requirements it opened to the public on May 28, 2015.

The above is just a small portion of what is written in the tour book. Learn more about this home on the Clifton House Tour. Buy your tickets in advance for $20 or on May 13 for $25.

2018 House Tour Reveal – Alscher Hancock House

Our fifth reveal for the 2018 Clifton House Tour is the Alscher Hancock House built in 2013.

This imaginative exercise in residential infill integrates Twentieth Century Modernism with more recent contemporary architecture, while being distinct from, yet compatible with, the surrounding historically-inflected homes.

The basically box-like form of their residence is actually an “L” shape hat opens up an extra seven degrees. The roof appears deceptively flat but is also slightly angled toward the center in what is known as a “butterfly” form. The home is enlivened outside and in by intersecting shapes at narrow angles that provide deep overhangs above the front entry and rear deck, as well as oriel windows (hanging bays) that relieve the rectangular overall form. The theme of angularity continues with the double butterfly shape of the roof recalling Mid-Century Modern design, with its high sides dipping downward to a central valley that provides both interior drama and efficient drainage. For the home’s façades, a juxtaposition between materials is created; although its basic exterior surfaces have a smooth stucco finish, raised panels of concrete block masonry are openly treated as mere veneer in order to be structurally honest, since they are non-load- bearing yet establish a layered, textural contrast. Also, stone was selected to relate sensitively to the native stone found in the site and reused in the landscaping.

The Alscher Hancock House has achieved the highest level of LEED certification-
Platinum.

The above is just a small portion of what is written in the tour book. Learn more about this home on the Clifton House Tour. Buy your tickets in advance for $20 or on May 13 for $25.

2018 House Tour Reveal – Louis W. Kaiser House

Our fourth reveal for the 2018 Clifton House Tour is the Louis W. Kaiser House, built in 1909.

Evoking the spirit of Frank Lloyd Wright’s early Prairie Style, this relatively modest home also represents the reaction against the excesses of Late Victorian Period Eclecticism. It was designed in 1909 for an officer of the once-prominent John Van Range Co. (a later rival of the Resor Stove Company). With emphasis on horizontal elements, the façade utilizes wide eaves that cross the first-floor front, the projecting porch, and even more deeply the main roof line. Used as roof supports at the front porch, bold masonry piers encase the entrance
and simplified wooden balusters. Plain square windows punctuate the bare walls.

The above is just a small portion of what is written in the tour book. Learn more about this home on the Clifton House Tour. Buy your tickets in advance for $20 or on May 13 for $25.

2018 House Tour Reveal – John G. Japp House

Our third reveal for the 2018 Clifton House Tour is the John G. Japp House, built in 1905.

This splendid example of the American Four-Square architectural form (the cubical
two-story equivalent of a one-story “bungalow’) is elaborated by subtle period
references, while retaining its overall Arts & Crafts character. Each façade is almost
symmetrical with the centers emphasized by dormers that share the gentle “rake” or
outward slope of the hipped red-tiled roofs. One of the earth-tone orange-brick
home’s distinguishing features is the use of alternating brick quoins to accentuate
the corners including those of the flat bays on the front and angled bays on the sides.
Also remarkable are the imposing chimneys which flair at their tops for emphasis.

The above is just a small portion of what is written in the tour book. Learn more about this home on the Clifton House Tour. Buy your tickets in advance for $20 or on May 13 for $25.